On the Net: Seven Disney Sins.

The Little Mermaid’s Ariel: Greed.

The grass sea is always greener bluer on the other side.

Snow White: Gluttony.

Forbidden fruit.

Beauty & the Beast’s Belle: Vanity.

Vanity fair. While Belle “herself is not vain, those around her seem to see nothing but her beauty…”

Cinderella: Lust.

Lust at first sight for a world that’s not her own.

Sleeping Beauty’s Aurora: Sloth.

Need I say more?

Aladdin’s Jasmine: Anger.

Well, she is feisty!

Peter Pan’s Tinkerbell: Envy.

Green with envy.

[Jezebel] The Seven Deadly Sins of Disney Princesses.

Images via Jezebel, via Flavorwire, via DeviantART.

On the Net: Dare to Dream.

A few weeks ago Disney unveiled Annie Leibovitz’s latest portraits in the Disney Dreams collection: Olivia Wilde as the Evil Queen and Alec Baldwin as the enchanted mirror man in Snow White & the Seven Dwarves, Penelope Cruz and Jeff Bridges as Beauty & the Beast, and Queen Latifa as The Little Mermaid‘s Ursula.

For my money, they’ve got nothing on Leibovitz’s past creations of Rachel Weisz as Snow White, the ill-fated Zac Efron and Vanessa Hudgens as the Prince and Sleeping Beauty, or Jessica Biel as Pocahontas, but still worth a squiz.

[Disney Parks Blog] Disney Parks Unveils New Annie Leibovitz Disney Dream Portraits.

Images via Disney Parks Blog.

On the Net/Movies: Beauty & the Beast Remains Relevant.

From Beastly’s False Fairytale” by Alex Leo on Jezebel:

“Unlike Ariel giving up her voice for love or Sleeping Beauty being woken by Prince Charming, this story has immediate and practical implications for our culture—especially for young girls trying to figure out who they are and what they ‘have to do’ to be accepted. The problem is that while the story sets the goal that the Beast stop judging people based on their looks and learn to see the beauty within, the male lead always ends up with a hot woman. It’s right there in the title! She’s a beauty and he’s a monster and I am confused. If the point is that he truly change and accept that looks are merely skin-deep, then shouldn’t he end up with a less-than-stunning partner?”

[Jezebel] Beastly’s False Fairytale.

On the Net: More Disney/Hipster Mash-Ups.

Yesterday I promised some more Disney hipsters, so here they are:

[BuzzFeed] A Collection of the Best Hipster Disney Memes.

[Geekosystem] 20 of the Very Best Hipster Disney Princesses.

[The Early Bird Catches the Worm] Mean Girls 3: Disney Princess HIPSTER Version.

[The Early Bird Catches the Worm] Super-Villain.

[The Early Bird Catches the Worm] It’s Hip(ster) to be a Mermaid.

Images via BuzzFeed, Geekosystem.

On the Net: Super-Villain.

Disney hipster princesses are sooo mainstream, ugh!

The new wave in awesomeness is Disney villain hipsters, my favourites of which are Gaston and Belle (duh!) and Snow White’s evil stepmother.

[Urlesque] Hipster Disney Villains Are Way More Underground Than Hipster Disney Princesses.

[The Early Bird Catches the Worm] It’s Hip(ster) to Be a Mermaid.

[The Early Bird Catches the Worm] You Can Ring My Belle.

Images via Urlesque.

Movies: Blondes Have More Fun—And They’re Magical!—In Tangled.

The premise of the latest Disney princess effort—a retelling of the story of Rapunzel—is that the damsel in distress is locked away in her tower so that mean baddies won’t be able to find her and steal her supernatural healing powers.

The clincher is that if she cuts her long hair, it turns brown and loses its magical properties. A blatant favouritism of blondes over brunettes if ever there was one!

Granted, the brunette Disney princess has seen somewhat of a resurgence in recent years, with the first African American princess, Tiana, in The Princess & the Frog, Mulan, Esmeralda of The Hunchback of Notre Dame, Pocahontas, Jasmine from Aladdin, Beauty & the Beast’s Belle, and even the flame haired Little Mermaid. Perhaps the blonde haired heroines (okay, I wouldn’t exactly class Cinderella and Aurora as “heroines” per se, but Rapunzel certainly kicked some but in Tangled) wanted a shot at the multi-dimensional princess crown.

Other than that, I really enjoyed Tangled. I usually find Mandy Moore supremely annoying, her voice especially, but I could barely tell it was her throughout the movie. Chuck’s Zachary Levi was great as the misunderstood Flynn Rider/Eugene Fitzherbert. Unfortunately, I missed the first ten minutes or so due to a delicious brunch and Saturday morning traffic on Chapel Street, however it was fairly easy to pick back-story up at the tear jerking pinnacle. (Will definitely be catching it again at ACMI—at a mere $6, who could say no?)

[ACMI] Tangled.

Movies: The Best Movies I’ve Seen This Year.

Tomorrow, When the War Began. Check out my review to see how strongly I feel about it.

Desk Set. This 1957 romantic comedy starring Katharine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy takes place in a reference library, and deals with the incorporation of computers to help the ladies in their cataloguing. With a healthy dose of the trademark ’50s slapstick rom-com dynamic and TDF fashion, I loved this one.

Easy A. Again, another I’ve done a review on. While I had high hopes for this one, it didn’t live up to them fully, but it is one of the smarter teen movies in recent memory. On par with Mean Girls, perhaps?

Rear Window. What took me so long, right? I watched this one for the first time last Christmas, and continued the tradition again this holiday season. Grace Kelly is luminous as “his girl Friday” to James Stewart’s L.B. Jeffries, who is the ultimate leading man. Hitchcock at his best.

Toy Story 3. It is unanimous that Toy Story 3 is one of the best movies released in 2010. Perhaps the best of the Toy Story franchise? Nah, my money’s on the first instalment.

Desperately Seeking Susan. So bad it’s good. The fashion is fabulous (on Madonna’s part, anyway) and Her Madgesty is surprisingly likable in it.

Sorry about the dismal effort in this post, but seriously; there were no good movies this year! You only have to look at Sex & the City 2 (which I quite liked, but will admit was baaad), The Expendables and Killers for proof of that.

That’s why I spent a lot of my cinema-going money on the classics, such as Gentlemen Prefer Blondes and Beauty & the Beast in 3D. That counts as a movie I haven’t seen before this year, right? Right…?

[The Early Bird Catches the Worm] Movies/Book Review: Tomorrow, When the War Began by John Marsden.

[The Early Bird Catches the Worm] Movie Review: Easy A.

[The Early Bird Catches the Worm] Movie Review: Sex & the City 2.

[The Early Bird Catches the Worm] Movie Review: The Expendables.

[Jezebel] Is Easy A The Next Mean Girls?

[Jezebel] I Went to See Killers & It’s All Your Fault.

Video: Beauty & the Bestiality Take 2—Advice from Belle.

My friend Zoe sent me this video month ago, but I thought it was particularly poignant to post here now, given the abundance of Disney/Beauty & the Beast related content in recent weeks.

More Disney princess advice to come.

[The Early Bird Catches the Worm] Attack of the Three Dimensional Disney Character.

[The Early Bird Catches the Worm] The Litte Mermaid: Part of Glee‘s World?

[The Early Bird Catches the Worm] You Can Ring My Belle. 

[The Early Bird Catches the Worm] Video: Mean Girls 3—The Disney Princess Version.

[The Early Bird Catches the Worm] Drug of Choice: The Disney Heroine.

Attack of the Three Dimensional Disney Character.

So there’s the vanilla damsels in distress of early Disney films, like Snow White, Sleeping Beauty and Cinderella.

And there’s the first independent princess, Belle, “who enjoyed reading and learning, and who lived her life according to her standards”.

But there’s a new kind of three dimensional Disney character, in the form of the villain.

Now, The Beast from Beauty & the Beast isn’t exactly new (he’s pushing 20 years old), but seeing the process the Disney animators went through to create him in Dreams Come True: The Art of Disney’s Classic Fairytales (there’s also some featurettes on the DVD, which has been re-released from the vault) reveals just how complex a character he is.

Incorporating features from a buffalo, bear, gorilla, lion, boar and wolf, but with gentle cows ears, ensures The Beast doesn’t come across as completely horrible.

Both in the exhibition and in the curator’s talk I attended, it was mentioned that despite his ugly exterior, the Beast had to have attributes (both physicalthe aforementioned cows ears, and blue eyesand personality-wise) that a beautiful woman of Belle’s integrity, intelligence and courage could fall in love with. (It could be argued that there are some classic abusive relationship markers in Belle and the Beast’s union, but more to come on that next week.)

Elsewhere, in the upcoming Tangled, which is also featured in Dreams Come True, Mother Gothel, Rapunzel’s keeper, is the movie’s villain. However, she and Rapunzel share are more complicated relationship than that of Snow White and the Evil Queen, Cinderella and her evil stepmother, or Aurora and Maleficent (whose appearance was based on Katharine Hepburn, FYI), in that the animators wanted Mother Gothel to be “believable for Rapunzel to love”. God knows I’ve had my fair share of love-hate with my mother, so I think this movie will be quite relatable in that respect.

Can’t wait to see it in January!

[Overthinking It] Why Strong Female Characters Are Bad for Women.

[Overthinking It] Why Weak Male Characters Are Bad for Women.

[The Early Bird Catches the Worm] You Can Ring My Belle.

[The Early Bird Catches the Worm] Women in Fiction: Are Our Favourite Female Characters Actually Strong, or Stereotypes?

[The Early Bird Catches the Worm] Women in Fiction: My Favourite Fictional Females.

You Can Ring My Belle.

From Disney’s Dreams Come True: The Art of Disney’s Classic Fairytales:

“Arthur Rackham, the famed British illustrator of children’s fairytale books, said that there is no doubt that ‘we should be behaving ourselves very differently if Beauty had never been united to her Beast.’

“In Belle, Disney had its first independent female character, one who enjoyed reading and learning, and who lived her life according to her standards. Longing for substance in her life, she shunned the vacuous Gaston, over whom all the other ladies in town swooned. Belle’s genuine selflessness also distinguished her from the other women in town, including, most particularly, the ladies who pursued Gaston.

“While anyone else would have been overcome with fear, Belle’s devotion to her father gave her the courage to stay alone with the fearsome Beast in his remote castle.

“Her strong will earned the respect and devotion of the Beast.”

While some would say the Beast is the Disney equivalent to an emotionally abusive boyfriend (watch this space), this description of Belle shows that you have to love yourself before someone else will.

Plus, it proves that Belle is the most bitchin’ of the Disney princesses.

[The Early Bird Catches the Worm] Drug of Choice: The Disney Heroine.

[The Early Bird Catches the Worm] Mean Girls 3: The Disney Princess Version.

[The Early Bird Catches the Worm] Women in Fiction: My Favourite Fictional Females.

[The Early Bird Catches the Worm] Women in Fiction: Are Our Favourite Fictional Females Actually Strong, or Stereotypes?

[The Early Bird Catches the Worm] The Representation of Trees in the World of Walt Disney.