Magazine Cover of the Week: Kate Moss Might Regret Not Being in George Michael’s “Freedom ’90″ Video, But French Vogue Makes Up for It By Featuring Them Together on Their Cover.

With George Michael camping it up at the Olympics Closing Ceremony and visiting Australian shores in November, there’s no better time for him to be featured with supermodel bestie Kate Moss on the October cover of French Vogue.

Moss has always maintained that not being featured as one of the myriad of supermodels in Michaels’ “Freedom ’90″ is one of her biggest career regrets, but that is all in the past with her taking up prime real estate in Michaels’ latest video for “White Light”.

As Jezebel notes, the ’90s are definitely back.

Image via Jezebel.

New Weekly Post: My Week in Pictures.

The morning hot air balloons.

You know it’s early when the hot air balloons are still up and about. This is the view from my street…

… while this is the actual view from my apartment window.

A few weeks ago I posted the view from my street, but this is the view from the corner of my loungeroom window.

The birthday girl.

You might remember Zoe from her George Michael paper dolls, or the new artwork for this here blog. Last Friday was her birthday and we celebrated by going out for drinks and dinner.

The bath.

Almost every second Saturday I come home after a hard day of interacting with the moronic general public and collapse into the bath. It’s starting to become a ritual…

Rock of Ages.

On Tuesday night, myself, my friends Eddie and Clare, and Clare’s family, went to see Rock of Ages at the Comedy Theatre. It was very funny, self-aware and had some great tunes. Review to come next week.

The stack.

Related: [The Early Bird Catches the Worm] My Week in Pictures 14th July 2011.

[The Early Bird Catches the Worm] My Week in Pictures 7th July 2011.

[The Early Bird Catches the Worm] My Week in Pictures 1st July 2011.

[The Early Bird Catches the Worm] George Michael Paper Dolls in Independent Zine ZINm.

Magazines: George Michael Paper Dolls in Independent Zine ZINm.

Check out my friend Zoe Meagher’s George Michael paper doll that appeared in the latest issue of independent zine, ZINm, by Marc Bonnici. Choose between a “Choose Life” t-shirt clad “Wake Me Up Before You Go Go” era George, a jukebox and skin-tight jeans George in the “Faith” video, or community service George! I especially love the ’80s mullet attachment!

Watch this space for more Zoe goodness to celebrate The Early Bird Catches the Worm‘s one year blogosphere anniversary with a redesign!

[The Early Bird Catches the Worm] Independent Zine ZINm Preview.

Event: Party Like It’s 1986.

What better way to celebrate my friend Laura’s 25th birthday than costumed bowling… with the theme from the year she was born. (Do the math. Otherwise there’s a hint the answer in the title of this post!)

My friends Sallie, Clare and I went as Barbie and the Rockers, while some other standouts were David Bowie in Labyrinth, the birthday girl in Boy George drag, and two Top Guns.

Monday night bowling had never been so much fun!

Look at the size of his…

Barbie and the Rockers!

The goblin queen king.

Singing “Fame” for free drinks!

“I’m down on my knees, I wanna take you there!”

“I know not everybody has got a body like you!”

Wrong way, Clare!

Channeling Dexy’s Midnight Runners, perhaps?

“Karma, karma, karma, karma, karma chameleon…”

Embracing the ’80s dance moves.

[The Early Bird Catches the Worm] United States of Ameri-Canada.

[The Early Bird Catches the Worm] Come On Barbie, Let’s Go Party!

[The Early Bird Catches the Worm] Bad Taste Foxymorons.

[The Early Bird Catches the Worm] Getting Our Pirate On, Christmas Party Style.

[The Early Bird Catches the Worm] The Witching Hour: Halloween/My Birthday at Witches in Britches Cabaret.

Event: Really Nice Day Cabaret.

Tucked away in the quirky privacy of The Butterfly Club in South Melbourne last night was the debut show of Christine Moffat’s left-of-centre cabaret, Really Nice Day.

It deals with the strained relationship of unlucky-in-love Kitty Day and her piano player, Joe (or “Houdini… whatever”) who has been forcibly coerced into providing the soundtrack to Kitty’s tragicomic love story. And forcibly coerced = tied to the piano using the same knots her mother did when tethering Kitty to her own piano as a child. The apple doesn’t fall far from the tree…

The show started out a little bit rocky, with what I assumed was first night jitters, but then went full steam ahead for about an hour, with such musical gems as The Cardigans’ “Lovefool” and Wham!’s “Freedom” (not to be mistaken for George Michael’s supermodel-solo hit, “Freedom ’90”. I’ve affixed a YouTube clip of the single below for your viewing pleasure) making appearances.

Expect a teensy bit of “imaginary” audience interaction, which isn’t hard, as the endearing Kitty brings out the crazy (in) love in all of us. Emphasis on the crazy.

But really, what’s a homicidal girl to do? You’ll have to see Really Nice Day to find out. Tickets available on the night from The Butterfly Club, online and over the phone (9690 2000).

[The Butterfly Club] Christine Moffat in Really Nice Day.

[The Butterfly Club] Location.

[The Early Bird Catches the Worm] Event Preview: Really Nice Day Cabaret.

Image via Pro Talent Sites.

Magazines: Goodbye TV Hits, It Was Nice Knowing You.

The first magazine I ever bought was TV Hits.

I remember sticking posters of Jonathan Taylor Thomas, George Michael and Dean Cain of Lois & Clark fame on the wall of the room I shared with my sister.

I remember knowing the words to every Top 40 song that was released from about 1996 to 1999 (when I graduated from primary school and onto Dolly), thanks to the lyric card cut-outs each edition came complete with, which comes in handy for ’90s themed dance nights.

I remember hiding my latest copy under my desk at school and reading it cover to cover during class, then again when I got home.

I remember friends commenting that they were jealous of me for being a walking Wikipedia for all things celebrity.

TV Hits was where my love affair with pop culture began, and I was known to lose sleep waiting for the latest issue to come out the next day. My mind was a sponge back then, and after much sorting, I can usually recall some of that info.

But Girl with a Satchel reports that TV Hits is to fold, and while it has become a shadow of the magazine Mecca it once was, its nostalgic influence makes me sad to see it go.

But with blogs and mobile phones and Twitter and what not, the tween music mag has become obsolete. While back when I was its number one fan, the mag was much more of a TV Week meets the entertainment section of Famous or NW publication, it had devolved (evolved?) to strictly music, with a little bit of light TV and movies on the side.

The news comes at a time when fellow Australian mag Notebook: has released its final issue, highlighting the fact that unless a magazine is selling desirable numbers year on year, month on month, week on week, and if similar content is available elsewhere (online), there’s no place for it on the newsstand.

So, in honour of TV Hits, let’s break out the Spice Girls-style platform sneakers, spin some Best of 1998 albums and trek to the Reject Shop for some hair mascara and butterfly clips, and party like it’s 1999.

[Girl with a Satchel] TV Hits R.I.P.

[Girl with a Satchel] A TV Hits Clarification.

[Girl with a Satchel] GWAS Media Satchel.

[The Early Bird Catches the Worm] Goodbye Notebook:, It Was Nice Knowing You.

The Changing Face of Beauty.

I’ve been meaning to visit Modelinia for a while now, and their History of Models timeline got me thinking about beauty norms across the ages since models became mainstream. Modelinia’s timeline begins in 1928 and follows the top faces (and bodieshello, Elle “The Body” McPherson), such as Twiggy, Iman and Lauren Hutton, through to today’s most famous faces.

Modelinia’s timeline begins with society girls like Dorian Leigh, who was perhaps the “world’s first supermodel” and appeared on the cover of Vogue seven times in 1944 and earned $300,000, “an amount that was unheard of during that time”. Leigh’s partnership with famed photographer Richard Avedon paved the way for future “model as muse” photographer-model dynamics. Leigh was also one of the models who inspired the classic, Breakfast at Tiffany’s.

The late 1940s and ’50s ushered in the age of “Hollywood glamour”, when Leigh appeared on Broadway in The Fifth Season, and “Million Dollar Baby” Lisa Fonssagrives married photographer Irving Penn. These women also proved there was life after modelling, with Fonssagrives “designing a line of leisurewear for Lord & Taylor”, and Leigh opening her own modelling school in Paris, much like Tyra Banks and Heidi Klum today.

The period beginning in 1960 was known as the “awakening” and spawned the births of McPherson, Linda Evangelista, Paulina Porizkova, Cindy Crawford, Stephanie Seymour, Christie Turlington, and Naomi Campbell, the women who would later become known as the über-models of the ’90s.

The ’60s were the years of Twiggy, whose picture was discovered hanging in a hairdresser’s window, and in 1965 she appeared on the cover of Vogue in three separate countries, landing the American edition thrice. She was also the subject of three separate documentaries that year, following on from her radio debut, with the single “Beautiful Dream” in 1964.

Around this time, Hutton refused to close the gap in her teeth, paving the way for the gap-toothed everywhere, like Madonna and Aussie model Jessica Hart.

It was a period of firsts for Hutton, which carried over into the ’70s, who was the first model to front a fragrance campaign, the first to sign an “exclusive cosmetics contract” and the first to reach $1 million in earnings.

The days of disco saw the birth days of the second wave of ü ber-models, like Klum, Shalom Harlow, Banks, Kate Moss, and Laetitia Casta, and the juxtapositioning of the all-American girl next door, Christie Brinkley, with the exotic beauty of Iman. In 1974, Brinkley signed a cosmetics contract with Covergirl, which resulted in a 20-year partnership. Iman served as muse for Yves Saint Laurent, who released his African Queen collection in 1978. While Brinkley appeared on the cover of Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Edition three years in a row (19771979), Iman proved she has commercial appeal, fronting “the June cover of Italian Cosmopolitan” in 1978.

The era of the “poster girl” (commencing with Brinkley’s aforementioned Sports Illustrated cover in 1987 and culminating in the permeation of models in the mainstream) sees models on the covers of all major magazines, from Life to Cosmo to Vogue to Playboy.

And if the saturation of popular culture in the ’80s seemed extreme, the ’90s sought to solidify this with “the rise of the supermodel”, coinciding with “the waif” ideal popularised by Moss’s “heroin chic” look (or as we would find out in 2005, cocaine chic), which was perhaps named for Calvin Klein’s Heroin Kids campaign, which Moss fronted in 1994 .

George Michael’s classic Freedom ’90 featured a bevy of supermodels, including Crawford, Turlington, Campbell, Evangelista, and Tatjana Patitz, in 1988. To accompany this, said models appeared on the cover of British Vogue, followed by the iconic group runway walk for Versace in 1989.

The rapid rise of Seymour began in 1989, when she appeared nude in Playboy, began dating Axl Rose of Guns N’ Roses and appeared in their “Don’t Cry” video clip, followed by “November Rain”. She became the first major model to sign with lingerie empire Victoria’s Secret in 1990, followed by her runway debut for Valentino.

It is interesting to note that the über-models of this time worked primarily in beauty campaigns and magazines before debuting on the runway, whereas now it’s the other way around. There are a lot of nameless and faceless models who walk on the runways and act solely as “clothes hangers” for the garments. It is rare that a model will move beyond that tag and permeate the zeitgeist, but those who have include Gisele Bündchen, Agyness Deyn, Daria Werbowy and Miranda Kerr.

Crawford’s star also rose even higher during this period, with her marriage to Richard Gere and her constant presence on magazines cover of all kinds, including a sexy 1991 cover of Vanity Fair, in which a bathing suit-clad Crawford shaves k.d. lang in a barbers chair.

But Crawford had some competition rapidly rising alongside her: Moss. In 1991, Moss fronted the Calvin Klein Obsession for Men campaign, as well as the Calvin Klein jeans ad together with Mark Wahlberg.

1992 was also a year for sexy magazine covers, with Seymour gracing Playboy for a second time, and McPherson making her debut for the magazine.

In other mag news, Crawford was asked to posed for the cover of the groundbreaking first edition of John F. Kennedy Jr.’s publication, George, aswho else?George Washington.

19941995 was surely Harlow’s time, as she added to her resume of film roles in In & Out, as well as gracing the cover of February W, March’s Paris Vogue, and June Harper’s Bazaar US in 1994, and March W, and December Vogue with fellow model-turned-actress, Amber Valetta.

That year Banks appeared on the cover of Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Edition, the first black model to do so solo.

With Bündchen’s appointment to Vogue cover girl in July 1997 the “heroin chic” era allegedly ended, and the championing of healthy bodies like Bündchen’s began. Maybe in the modelling world, but the “heroin chic” movement has wrecked havoc on the notions of beauty, body image and popular culture.

On a side note, recently Playboy.com profiled the changing of women’s breasts over the years, and Jezebel was quick to counter that its not our breasts that have changed, but the media’sie. Playboybelief of what they should look like (NSFW). It is not dissimilar in the case of beauty magazines aimed at women.

By the turn of the millennium, the age of the supermodel subsided, which was noticeable on magazine covers across the world, which began to, and still do, feature actresses and singers on their covers.

With the retirement of the most beautiful faces and bodies in the business, models almost ceased to be relevant, and women who made achievements for something other than their looks were championed. Obviously, there is still a large gap between women on magazines and television and in advertising campaigns and movies in correspondence to how they look rather than what they do, but looking back on the dominance of beauty in the ’80s and ’90s, we are slowly starting to celebrate diversity.

In addition, there’s the whirlwind surrounding plus-sized model Crystal Renn (is she plus-sized, isn’t she plus-sized?), and the model as somewhat of a prop for photographers, magazine editors and designers making a statement, as seen on Evangelista’s November 2009 cover for W magazine’s “The Art Issue”, or Claudia Schiffer (who, interestingly, was not featured in Modelinia’s timeline) and Karl Lagerfeld’s collaboration.

While it’s always nice to look a somethingone beautiful, it’s also nice to realise that there should be more to a model than what she looks like, and in a lot of cases, there is.

You only need to look at the aforementioned Banks and Klum’s careers in television (America’s Next Top Model and The Tyra Banks Show, and Project Runway and Germany’s Next Top Model, respectively), Erin Wasson’s foray into designing, and Kerr’s championing of a healthier life to see this in practice.

But I guess the question is, is this timeline representative of the success of certain types of models in response to our changing attitudes, or are our changing attitudes representative of the success of certain types of models?