Event: The Way We Wear Vintage Fashion Fair.

Clear your schedules, girls (and guys), for this coming weekend is the biannual vintage fashion fair, The Way We Wear.

Commencing this Friday night at 6pm til 9pm, and continuing on Saturday at 10am til 5pm, and Sunday 10pm til 4pm, at the Williamstown Town Hall on Ferguson Street. To get there by train, take the Werribee line to Newport, then take the Williamstown line one stop to North Williamstown, and it’s a ten minute walk from there.

I’ve been to the market twice, and let me tell you: it’s the best vintage event in Melbourne.

Each year revolves around a theme: last year’s were bridal and the little black dress, and this winter’s is the Titanic. Perhaps they were inspired by the Titanic-themed restaurant nearby, or the Melbourne Museum’s Titanic exhibition last year?

At 2pm on Saturday and Sunday there’ll be a “Dressed for the Voyage” fashion parade of garments worn around the time the Titanic sunk on its maiden voyage.

In addition to the always fantastic selection of vintage fashion and accessories, ranging from $2 to $2000, this year will incorporate vintage homewares into the mix for the very first time.

I don’t know about you, but I’m psyched! Tickets are $12 for adults, $6 for kids and are available at the door on the day.

Hope to see you there!

Related: The Way We Wear Vinatge Market.

Elsewhere: [The Way We Wear Vintage Fashion Fairs] Homepage.

Image via The Way We Wear Vintage Fashion Fairs.

Style VS. Fashion.

If you could be fashionable or stylish, which would you choose?

One incorporates fluro, Sass & Bide rats, digital prints and oversized tees; just some of the trends in the past few years that flatter most no one. The other consists of a personal style that transcends the trends. Think Kate Moss, Audrey Hepburn, Nicole Richie and Kate Middleton.

I know which group I would rather belong to, however, when people comment on my clothes, they usually call them trendy. Personally, I can’t think of a bigger insult!

Most of the clothes I buy, or want to buy, are things I’ve been lusting over for years, and are usually vintage or from a myriad of outlets, from “old-lady stores” like Brown Sugar and Blue Illusion, to second-hand markets, to Target, to Sportsgirl. I will admit to buying a plain red cami from Dotti a few weeks ago, but it’s the kind of item I’ll wear for years to come and is quite timeless… well, as timeless as Dotti can be!

One of my friends, whilst rifling through my closet, even commented that I really don’t have that many clothes. I asked why, then, can I not fit them all in. (I have several bags full of clothes hiding at the back of the wardrobe, which I alternate between seasons.) Said friend attempted to recover by saying, “well, you wear the same outfits a lot.” Like the Duchess of Cambridge?! (I wish!)

This is true, though. My favourite pair of shoes are five-year-old electric blue ballet flats that are hanging by a thread. My staple black trench coat for winter is also five years old. Long time Early Bird readers might remember the fantastic mustard yellow dress I picked up at a vintage fair for $30, which is one of my most prized sartorial possessions. I have a marcasite leopard brooch that is permanently affixed to my pleather bomber jacket (about three years old), which I paid a pretty penny for at an antique store… Shall I go on? ;)

Really, the only things I buy frequently in the clothing department are plain white, black and grey tees, jeans, and underwear.

I do like to look good (and my walk to work, where I’m confined to the limits of an unflattering uniform, is always a fashion parade!) but, when it comes down to it, clothes are just clothes, as the sometimes-fashion victim, but usually stylish, Whitney Port said on The Hills.

And you can still have a personal style without subscribing to the skinny jeans, crisp blazer and ballet flat norm of Kate and Nicole.

I have a few co-workers whose style I don’t necessarily like, but who remain true to it. One favours printed tees, badges and Etsy jewellery. Another likes to match her dress to her boots to her tights to her scarf to her hat to her bag. The third is hipster through and through, and has the most amazing collection of bright coats and bags from her grandmother.

These are the items of clothing that quintessentially “belong” to them and their personal style: you can’t find them in Bardot or Myer or Sass & Bide. And even if you could, they ain’t got nothin’ on the original: priceless.

So what I’m trying to say here is that money can’t buy style. Or that fashion fades, style is eternal. Or something. What do you think the difference between “fashion” and “style” is? Can you have both at the same time? Which camp would you rather belong to?

Related: The Way We Wear Vintage Market.

Images via Hills Freak, Saskia 4 Fashion, Franc Trunner, People Style Watch.

On the (Rest of the) Net.

 

Porn star Stoya Tweets, “If you think pubic hair on a woman is unnatural or weird, you aren’t mature enough to be touching vaginas.” You go, girl!

Beware hot baths in winter: they can cause heart attacks!

Celebrities and mental illness.

I was absolutely disgusted by Bob Ellis’ take on the ADFA sex scandal on ABC’s The Drum Unleashed, comparing the unconsented filming of a young female cadet during sex to the girls discussing last night’s date on Sex & the City. Here are some choice excerpts:

“Let us imagine the girl agreed to be filmed, and then, afterwards, being mocked for it, and flabbergasted by the number of leering hoons who saw the film, made the complaint. Would that then occasion the sacking of her commanding officer, the court-martial of fifteen or twenty of her fellow recruits, and the bastardising of her lover?

“… She would have been mortified. She would have cursed for months the prurient observers of her bed games. She would have railed at them in the canteen. She would have sobbed on the phone to her mother. She would have attracted some sympathy. She would almost certainly have got over it… And she might… have married the boy.”

“… They, and we, should be careful when we attend too closely to what occurs in a bedroom consensually, and how we punish either participant.

“… Is the young woman, moreover, to be named, and acclaimed, and promoted, and hereafter entrusted with frontline command on some field of battle? Who would trust her in any high army position? Who would be sure she was truthful? Or sound of judgment? Or loyal? Or reliable under fire?”

To end, he makes sure we know that group sex didn’t occur, “as it sometimes does in traveling footballers’ motel rooms”, as if that somehow makes it okay.

Kim Powell writes in response at News with Nipples about Ellis’ assertion that (male) society owns female bodies, as he began the above piece by reminiscing about an old M.A.S.H. episode in which the shower Hot Lips Houlihan is using is lifted by a crane and the menfolk gaze at her naked body.

Girl with a Satchel posts a smashing review of Tina Fey’s Bossypants.

Vintage Gala Darling, circa 2005. Glad to see she hasn’t changed :).

“7 Reasons to Get Excited About the Royal Wedding”… one week later!

In relation, is Princess Catherine doomed to repeat the same fate as Diana? A royal comparison.

Also, “Jessica Rudd shines some perspective on the wedding and the Republic.”

Much to my chagrin, tanning beds are safe… for some things!

Sarah Wilson on private schooling:

“I know parents want to provide the best for their own kids… I don’t know that fancy pools and excursions to Tuscany make for a better education.”

“Things Fat People Are Told”:

“If a fat person defied any of these pronouncements in any way, they spoke of having their lives and experiences denied. They couldn’t really have low blood pressure. They couldn’t really be getting married.

“The hostility fat people experience is extreme. One woman spoke about being on an operating table for a C-section and having a surgeon mock her fat, suggesting they get rid of it while they’ve got her open. Another spoke of sitting in an ambulance while a police officer refused to believe she was raped. Others were told they should be happy to have been sexually assaulted. We heard about how transgender persons were belittled for being too fat to pass. We heard about fat people who were sick and were denied treatment until they lost weight. Fat mothers were told they were selfish for being fat because they would orphan their children. Or that their children would never love them. Or that they’d just ruin their children’s lives so maybe the baby should just die in the womb.”

Lisa Simpson would “totally be a Jezebel reader if she were human.”

Images via Jezebel.

On the (Rest of the) Net.

 

Eight-year-old yellow wunderkind Lisa Simpson has her own book club.

Sarah Ayoub addresses Eddie Maguire’s racist comments in The Sydney Morning Herald.

Paula Joye at Girl with a Satchel on declining mag circulation.

How Hugh Hefner got his groove back at The New York Times.

I never thought there was a “link between autism and vaccinations” until my sister told me the story of how her boyfriend’s brother went from normal, happy and healthy baby to severely disabled after a vaccination. That made me think differently. This article will challenge your beliefs either way.

If “at least 40% of your diet consists of pre-packaged food”, “you don’t sleep enough for proper brain function” and “your boss knows you’re gullible”, you most likely work a 16-hour workday.

On stripping (take two):

“… the brotherly succor would partially exist in the form of shared ambivalence. I would venture to say that this how a majority of men feel about strippers… Do I enjoy strippers? Not really. Do I frequent tithouses often? No. Nor have I any close friends who do… I think men would be willing to renounce strippers if women renounced the Sex and the City franchise. I mean cut all cords. Shit’s gotten out of hand. No reruns. None of the third-wave dime store psychology. A complete effacement out of pop culture. You’re not even allowed hearken back to the simpler days when it meant something to you. Do we have a deal?”

Speaking of Sex & the City, is there a double standard between the second movie and lad flick Get Him to the Greek?

Is it possible to be a feminist and like fashion, too?

“I still get thrilled and impressed by bold, lovely, and often expensive fashion. And I still feel like I’m a person of worth, whether I’m wearing vintage Chanel or ‘vintage’ sweatpants. But I can’t seem to reconcile these two (competing?) impulses; on the one hand, a value in ‘art for art’s sake[’], beauty, style, and other intangibles; on the other, an investment in valuing substance over style, actions over appearances, and real justice over flamboyant showmanship.”

“What Your Favourite Magazine Says About You (Part II).”

Zoë Foster espouses the benefits of the “Better Man, Better Dan” theory.

 

Images via The Lisa Simpson Book Club, The Frisky.

Event: Go Get Frocked—The Way We Wear Spring Vintage Fashion Fair.

It’s that time of year again, when The Way We Wear vintage market rolls around again.

Six months ago I cleaned up, picking up a gorgeous yellow dress, some jewellery and some postcards.

This time, however, I had my heart set on an A-line floral skirt and/or dress, and maybe some more jewellery, but to my chagrin, the items that caught my eyea red, Victoria Beckham-esque shift and a navy and white floral A-line dress with matching bolerowere way out of my price range.

Instead, I got a scarf with a Hermes air about it, and a black satin poodle skirt for my Mum. As Clueless’s Cher would say, “It is a far, far better thing doing stuff for other people.”

In accompaniment to the vintage wares on sale, the event hosted a “Little Black Dress” exhibition, with authentic dresses from the likes of Chanel. In an ode to this week’s “Outfit Envy”, Lauren Conrad was also featured as a LBD aficionado!

Related: Event: The Way We Wear Vintage Market.

Nice Rack… I Mean Shelf.

I love nothing more than a good bookshelf.

Bookshelf Porn takes care of that, with the best shelves in all the landfrom vintage magazine prints, to the Shakespeare & Co. bookstore, to everyday bookshelves.

As you can tell from my own bookshelves (the two immediately below), I have a penchant for girlie, colour-coded arrangements with knick knacks galore.

However, I’m not opposed to organised chaos (below), as it gives books and the places they’re read a more cosy vibe.

Event: The Way We Wear Vintage Market.

This weekend I went to The Way We Wear Autumn Vintage Fashion Fair at the Williamstown Town Hall, and let me tell you, it was fab-u-lous!

I picked up some jewellery, vintage-inspired cards and a stunning mustard yellow, one-shouldered dress with black sash and shoulder detail that I can’t wait to wear.

 

I spent about $100 on my few items, but the calibre of clothes and accessories on display went up to the high hundreds and into the thousands of dollars. For example, Online Antiques had vintage Louis Vuitton, Tiffany and kimonos for purchase that, as Rachel Zoe would certainly have said if she’d been there, “I died” over.

There were also some gorgeous reworked ’50s dresses and beaded frocks dating back to the ’20s from the likes of one of Australia’s largest vintage sellers, Seams Old.

And the accompanying And the Bride Wore… exhibition featured a wedding gown from 1870!

Looking back on the day, I wish I’d had more time and money to spend… but there’s always the Vanity Fair Vintage Fashion Market in two weeks time to tide me over til November when the next The Way We Wear Fair rolls into (Williams)town!