On the (Rest of the) Net.

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The new generation of wrestlers are addicted to PlayStation more so than partying. [CNet]

And that’s a good thing, because so many wrestlers that have come before have been chewed up and spit out by the gruelling lifestyle, which I wrote about in the wake of Chyna’s death for The Big Smoke.

I also ponder whether you can be a feminist and a wrestling fan (which I’ve written about before) for SBS Zela.

Have you noticed all the headless women on movie posters? [Buzzfeed]

Of over 105 trans female characters portrayed on TV since 1965, only 20 of them were actually played by trans actors, mostly Alexandra Billings, Candis Cayne and Laverne Cox. [Autostraddle]

Why is the tampon tax getting so much attention? [The Cut]

In praise of the angry woman. [LA Times]

Panels like Sunrise‘s that ask if feminism has negatively impacted men “lends a false form of legitimacy to misogynists like [Mark] Latham”. [Daily Life]

“An ethically carnivorous life is possible so long as we ensure the animals we consume have lived and died without unnecessary suffering.” [The Guardian]

Image via Twitter.

Beauty & the Bestiality.

 

On Friday morning I got a text message from a friend saying I should blog about Joel Monaghan, the Canberra Raiders rugby player who was photographed “getting blown by a dog”.

I had Sunrise and The Morning Show on in the background, whilst blogging and being domesticated, and heard snippets of another rugby player behaving badly, but I had no idea until I Googled Monaghan’s name with “dog photo” and put two and two together. (If you wish to see the extremely NSFW picture with only a red dot protecting Monaghan’s modesty, head to Deadspin.)

It seems that we expect abhorrent behaviour from sportsmen; Matthew Johns and the group sex incident, rape allegations against Collingwood players after this year’s grand final (take two), and now this.

But is the fact that Monaghan is in talks with NRL officials about where to go from here a sign that we have become so desensitised to the repugnant actions of those with the money, fame and power to get away with themsportsmen in particular? Is it just “boys behaving badly?” I feel like I, personally, have become so desensitised to the seemingly weekly sexual assault allegations brought against sports players, that I almost expect it (“Oh, he allegedly raped a woman? Well, he’s a footy player; what did you expect?”). But I certainly was not expecting this, and I think the NRL, RSPCA and the Australian public should come down on Monaghan like a tonne of bricks.

More to come on men who actually love dogs later today.

Related: Why Are Famous Men Forgiven for Their Wrongdoings, While Women Are Vilified for Much Less?

Bad Boys, Whatcha Gonna Do? Host a Seven Family Show.

Back to the Draw-ing Board: Australia’s Year of Indecision.

Elsewhere: [Deadspin] What We Talk About When We Talk About A Dog Blowing An Australian Rugby Player.